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Randolph Magazine Vol. 8 No. 2

7 Sarah Biegelsen ’17 works with artifacts during her internship at Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest. national World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri, the National Park Service at Fort Pulaski in Georgia, the Friends of Rivermont Historical Society in Lynchburg, and the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission in Washington, D.C. Guidance and other support from Randolph’s Career Development Center helped Biegelsen gain this important practical experience outside the classroom. A history major, she was one of the first recipients of Randolph’s Jolley Mini-Grants last summer, which helped cover living expenses during her internship in Washington, D.C. “The Career Development Center helped me find internships, and they helped me prepare for interviews and spice up my resumé,” Biegelsen said. “Also, the Jolley Mini-Grant is amazing. It gives you the freedom to actually live in a city that you don’t live in, and it’s not just enough money to survive. It gives you enough to go to events and out to dinner every now and then.” Another important part of her experience at Randolph has been the personal and professional connections she has made. “It’s no wonder people come to Randolph for its close-knit community,” Biegelsen said. “I love the professors here, and I like being a big fish in a small pond because there are more opportunities. I could easily join any club, and I’ve had all these work study opportunities and five internships. The fact that it’s so personal is really admirable.” i


Randolph Magazine Vol. 8 No. 2
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