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Randolph Magazine Vol. 8 No. 2

23 and at the opening reception for Investigating Identity. “I’m really glad to see this exhibit cover identity holistically, especially with the political climate we’re in where gender identity is being attacked,” said Morgan Osburn ’18. “I like that Professor Shipley found a way to comment on the political climate without actually making a statement about it. It was just brilliant.” Another student, Angie Chen ’17, rediscovered a personal connection with one of the paintings in the exhibit. Chen first saw Kukuli Velarde’s Letter to My Father when she was 13 years old, following the death of her mother. The painting, which depicts a grieving mother and child, provided comfort and helped her through another emotional time, following the death of her father in January. Chen spoke about her bond with the painting during the annual Love at the Maier event in February. “It was an inspiration to be able to see this piece at both the beginning and end of a grieving period, which was weirdly a blessing,” Chen said. “If you had told me to talk about this piece without the loss of my father, the tone of my talk would have not been as deep and personal. Well, it would have still been deep and personal, however, it would have the tone of someone who has healed.” Shipley will continue to organize programs about identity in art moving forward. During the 2017-18 academic year she will teach two new courses: History of African American Art and Art and Activism. “I think my interest in identity and art has kind of fueled my teaching, in particular,” Shipley said. “I’m finding my students to be very engaged, interested, and ready to talk about these difficult issues.” Lesley Shipley A student helps with the Investigating Identity exhibition. The opening for Lesley Shipley’s exhibition at the Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College drew faculty, staff, students, and community members.


Randolph Magazine Vol. 8 No. 2
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