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    The Heick Symposium

    Creating a Culture of Change: Creative, Meaningful, and Sustainable Instruction

    Saturday, November 18, 2017

    Register now for our 2017 Heick Symposium. Contact Keeley Tuggle, ktuggle@randolphcollege.edu, with any questions.

    9-10 a.m.  Keynote Address - A Look Back Provides a Path Forward

    It's time to rethink the educational delivery systems of the twentieth century and return to the multi-disciplinary approach favored by the great scholars of the past. The silo system of teaching is no longer producing the innovative thinking that is necessary to compete in a global economy. By returning to the learning techniques employed in past centuries, we find our playbook for the future.

    Kristin Genova Richardson ’79
    Richardson received a B.A. in Spanish and biology from Randolph-Macon Woman’s College, and also studied at the University of Madrid achieving fluency in Spanish. She worked for E.F. Hutton in the Capital Markets Group, holding positions in government bond trading and in institutional fixed income sales.

    Richardson currently serves on numerous state, local, and national boards and committees. Education is her passion, and her community service is primarily focused in the educational arena. She currently serves on the boards for BBVA Compass Bank, the Colorado Children’s Hospital, the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, the Smithsonian National Board, and the Smithsonian Science Education Center, where she assumed Chairmanship in 2013. Previously she served on the board for TBD Colorado, the Denver Academy, and the Denver Public Schools Foundation. She has received numerous awards for her work in education, including the 2010 I Have A Dream Foundation Award, the 2010 Community Volunteer Award for National Philanthropy Day, the 2013 Girl Scout Woman of Distinction Award, and the 2017 Kempe Foundation Community Award.

    10:15-11:15 a.m.  Breakout Sessions:

    EL Education: Aspire for a Better World

    EL Education (formerly Expeditionary Learning) focuses on preparing teachers to meet the needs of diverse learners through a meaningful program focused on substantive change in schools. The goal is to ensure all students master rigorous content, develop positive character, and produce high quality work. This session will introduce you to the mission, vision and educational approach to this exciting learning model.

    Ginger Hill Worden ’69
    Worden served as the interim president of Randolph College from July 2006-August 2007—the academic year after the College’s Board of Trustees voted to admit men. She has a personal passion for social justice and education. With her husband, Geoff Worden, she founded Bridges, a homeless outreach effort in New York City. She studied at Union Theological Seminary and was ordained as an interfaith minister in 2003. She is an alumna of New York University's law school, and in the mid-1970s practiced law with the Wall Street firm of Davis Polk and Wardwell. Worden has also been very involved in her community, and is a trustee emerita for Kent Place School and board chair for Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound.

    College and Career: Ready for the Challenge

    What do employers need for the 21st century workforce? Getting students out of their seats and engaged in citizen education is key. An alumna and a local administrator will share instructional strategies teachers are using to facilitate educational opportunities to ensure high school graduates have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to meet career and college demands.

    Peggy Schimmoeller, moderator
    Schimmoeller has been at Randolph College since 1993 and is a professor and the director of Randolph College’s Education Department. During this time, she created a liberal studies major for students interested in elementary education, started Randolph’s first graduate degree program (the Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program), and successfully led the Education Department in receiving national accreditation through the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). She is involved in many projects that help teachers provide quality instruction in science and mathematics.

    Timothy Beatty
    Beatty taught world history at Heritage High School in the Lynchburg City School Division from January 1998-June 2001. He then taught in Roanoke, and returned to Heritage to become the school’s associate principal from 2007 – 2012. In 2012, he was named principal of HHS. Beatty is graduate of Hampden-Sydney College, and he holds a master’s degree from Radford University.

    Derrick Brown
    Brown holds a master’s degree in educational leadership and is currently working on his doctorate in leadership studies. He holds a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from Virginia Tech, and received his teacher licensure from the University of Virginia. He was named the principal of Dunbar Middle School for Innovation in June 2016. Brown worked as the assistant principal for Amherst Middle School from 2012-2016. Prior to his administrative experience, he served as a biology teacher at Amherst County High School. In addition, he is the founder of the IRON Leadership and Character Program, which was developed to decrease discipline issues, increase attendance, and raise academic standards.

    Karen Campbell ’77
    Campbell recently retired after 31 years as associate professor of sociology and senior associate dean for undergraduate education for the College of Arts and Science at Vanderbilt University. Her research interests focused on gender inequality, occupations and professions, and social networks. She has received numerous awards recognizing her contributions to the institution, such as the Mentoring Award, Affirmative Action Award, and the Jeffrey Nordhaus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in the College of Arts and Science. She completed her graduate studies at the University of North Carolina. 

    Leidra McQueen
    McQueen is the director of the Beacon of Hope Future Center at Heritage High School. She was recently named a 2017 Millennial on the Move by Lynchburg Business magazine. She is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where she earned a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology. McQueen is a former member of the University of Virginia’s College Advising Corps and the University of South Carolina’s TRIO programs. Ultimately, passion for student access and success in higher education for students in her hometown brought her back to Virginia in 2013.

    11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.  Luncheon: Tiny House, Big Impact

    Middle school students, school administrators, Randolph College faculty, and M.A.T. students share their tiny house building project funded by a 21st Century Grant. This STEAM project, which is part of Randolph’s Kids In College program, provided an opportunity for middle school and college students to work together on a yearlong design and building project, and gave them the opportunity to apply rigorous math, science, and architecture skills in an integrated manner. The middle school students will share their experience and give you an opportunity to tour their house. 

    Derrick Brown
    Brown holds a master’s degree in educational leadership and is currently working on his doctorate in leadership studies. He holds a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from Virginia Tech, and received his teacher licensure from the University of Virginia. He was named the principal of Dunbar Middle School for Innovation in June 2016. Brown worked as the assistant principal for Amherst Middle School from 2012-2016. Prior to his administrative experience, he served as a biology teacher at Amherst County High School. In addition, he is the founder of the IRON Leadership and Character Program, which was developed to decrease discipline issues, increase attendance, and raise academic standards.

    Consuella Woods
    Woods is an education professor at Randolph College. After about 34 years as a teacher and principal for local public school divisions, Woods left the world of public education to become an education professor at Randolph College. A graduate of Bluefield State College, Woods received her master's degree from Lynchburg College and also completed work at the University of Virginia. Woods was the first minority female to serve on the Virginia Association of Secondary School Principals and was an officer of Phi Delta Kappa. She has served with numerous school and community organizations including Camp Child, The Lynchburg Family Physicians Board of Directors, and the Lynchburg College Advisory Board.

    1-2 p.m. Thinking Beyond the 21st Century and Teaching Thought

    Panel participants will share their involvement in creating and supporting environments that facilitate students in persisting, building working relationships, responding with awe, questioning, innovating, thinking creatively and interdependently, and helping students answer the question: Why learn?

    Peggy Schimmoeller, moderator

    Susan Cash
    Cash has spent the last 25 years in various educational positions and has been director for the XLR8-Lynchburg Regional Governor’s STEM Academy since it opened in 2013.  Previously she worked for Lynchburg City Schools, where she served as the division-wide career counselor and as a school counselor at Heritage High School. She holds an undergraduate degree in psychology with a minor in special education from James Madison University. Cash earned her master of education degree in school counseling in 2001, and a master of education in education leadership in 2012, both from Lynchburg College. She received the 2006 Creating Excellence Award from the Virginia Department of Education.

    Jolley Bruce Christman ’69
    Christman is an expert in the area of education, especially urban education, and is a past president of Research for Action, a non-profit organization engaged in education research and evaluation aimed at improving the opportunities for those disadvantaged by race, class, gender or culture. Christman has authored more than two-dozen book chapters and journal articles as well as numerous reports on these topics. She earned her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, where she subsequently taught at the university’s Graduate School of Education and was given its Helen C. Bailey Award, which recognizes outstanding alumni.

    Tracy Jo Proffitt ’04
    Proffitt received her elementary teaching license and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She is currently the STREAM coach and math remediation specialist for R.S. Payne Elementary School. Proffitt has been teaching in the Lynchburg City Schools system for 11 years and is very involved in providing all students access to integrated science, technology, reading, engineering, arts, and mathematics. She designed Lynchburg City School’s first STREAM Lab, a maker space that offers all students access to an environment that encourages creativity and exploration.

    Our Sponsor

    The Heick Symposium is made possible by the Betty Jo Denton Heick ’45 Annual Symposium Fund at Randolph College. Created through a generous bequest from the estate of Betty Jo Denton Heick, a 1945 graduate of Randolph-Macon Woman's College, the fund supports the exploration of contemporary academic issues.

    Heick, active all her life in Democratic politics, retired after 45 years as an elected official of Bourbon County, Kentucky (serving 27 years as county clerk and 18 years as deputy clerk). She also served on the Democratic National Finance Committee.

    She credited R-MWC with helping to shape her vision of what was possible to achieve in life. After graduation, she served two terms on the Alumnae Association’s board of directors and enjoyed the stimulus of sharing ideas with other generations of R-MWC women.

    One of her most rewarding experiences occurred when a young woman who held a Kentucky state office came up to her and said, "Thank you, Betty Jo, for leading the way for all women." That unexpected comment, said Heick, “made it all worthwhile.”